Aprons

With the legs complete, I turned my attention to the four aprons (B). I began by cutting them to size (3Vi>" x 12"), see Fig 4.

TENONS. The next step is to cut tenons that are centered on the ends of the aprons, see Fig. 4. To do this, I used a dado blade buried in an auxiliary fence. And a miter gauge with a backing board supports the workpieces and prevents chipout.

Though the mortises are offset, the tenons should be centered. So gradually raise the dado blade, flipping the piece between passes, until the tenons fit the mortises.

Next, you want the length of the tenon to match the mortise. To do this, I cut a shoulder at the bottom of the tenon by standing the apron on edge, see Fig 5. The height of the blade (Vi") should be right, but check your piecesjust to make sure.

ASSEMBLY. Once the tenons have been cut, the base can be assembled. To do this, first glue up two sub-assemblies: two legs and an apron. Thenjoin the sub-assemblies with the two remaining aprons, see Fig. 6.

FASTENERS. The last stepisto prepare the base for attaching the top. I usedfour figure-8 fasteners, see Fig. 7. They're more than just an easy way to connect the top to the

base. They allow the panel to expand and contract with changes in humidity.

To install the frgure-8 fasteners, drill two ■'/le" holes, '/fl" deep in two ofthe aprons, see

Fig. 7a. This hole is offset toward the inside of the apron and acts as a shallow mortise for the fastener. With the holes drilled, the fasteners are simply screwed in place.

Fig. 7a. This hole is offset toward the inside of the apron and acts as a shallow mortise for the fastener. With the holes drilled, the fasteners are simply screwed in place.

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