Bookshelf

After completing the chest, building the tail bookshelf that rests on top might be a pleasant change of pace. Not that the chest was ail that difficult, but the bookshelf is quite a bit less complicated.

THE CASE. Whenever I build a project that might hold heavy books or other objects, I try to keep one idea front and center. 1 want to make certain the case is up to the task. And if you take a look at the drawings at right, you'll see that strength shouldn't be a concern.

The case is basically just a plv-wood box. The two sides, the top and bottom, and the center di\ ider are all cut from %" plywood. Tie same tongue and dado joiner, that produced a solid lowercase is used to join the upper case (detai a And notice that the center she.: -v joined to the sides just like die case top and bottom. This adds an extra measure of stiffness to the hole case and will keep the sides from bowing out under a he.*-\ \ i

There are a couple details you don't want to forget before trembling the case. First, the two sides are rabbeted along the back edge to accept the '/j" plywood back (detail 'b'). The top, bottom, and center divider are cu: narrower than the sides to let the back lap over. And you'll need to drill shelf pin holes in the sides for the adjustable shelves.

THE FACE FRAME. Once the case is glued up, a face frame is added just like the lower chest (detail 'c'|. For a quick review, first cut the two stiles to size and glue them to the case flush to the outside edges. Then the top, bottom, and center rails are cut to fit and added to the case. A chamfer routed on the out-j/ side edge of the stiles wraps it up.

BACK. With the face frame complete, the back can be cut to fit and screwed to the case (detail 'b').

woodscrew

NOTE: Back is screwed to case

NOTE: Drill 'A"-dia. holes for shelf pins

NOTE: Butt joints used for face frame

Tongue and dado

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