Doors

Next, I turned my attention to the doors. Like the sides, the doors are held together with simple stub tenon and groove joinery. And again, the rails and stiles hold panels that are made up of two layers of W-thick plywood. But unlike the sides, these doors have arcs cut on their upper rails.

door size. But before actually beginning to build the doors, you need to figure out their overall size.

Since these doors are inset in the case, I made mine Vs" shorter than the opening to allow for a Vi6" gap at the top and bottom, see Fig. 19a. Then I did the same with the side-to-side measurement. This means that when the doors are built, they'll fit the opening with no gap between the doors. Doing it this way gives me some leeway in case I'm off a little when building the door. I can trim off just what I need to from the inside edges of the doors until there's a perfect Vi6" gap between them to match the gap at the top, bottom, and sides, see Fig. 19b.

I started the doors by cutting both the 1"-thick stiles (T) and rails (U) to size, see drawing at right. The next step is to cut the stub tenon and groove joints that connect the frame. These are the same joints that were used on the side panels earlier. But there is one difference though. The upper rails have an arc cut along the bottom edge. This way when the doors are closed, these arcs match the arc cut on the lower front rail, refer to Fig. 19.

upper rail groove. Cutting the arc isn't a problem, but the groove in the arc is another matter. You could use a slot cutter bit

2V2"

207/m"

Hinge mortise

207/m"

2V2"

and a router, but I used a different method. Instead of cutting the groove after the arc, I cut the groove first on the table saw. I made this groove deeper and then left the panels square, see drawing.

To do this, raise the blade to 2" and make a second pass on the upper rails only, see Fig. 17. Then, dry assemble the door frame and cut the panels (V) to fit all the way into the grooves.

arcs. Now the arcs can be laid out on the upper rails. To do this, dry assemble the doors and set them side by side, see Fig. 18. Then take the template you used to lay out the arcs on the front rails and draw the arcs. Note: Make sure the groove is 3/s" deep at the narrowest part of the rail.

When the arcs are cut out, the doors can be glued up. Trim them so they fit the case opening with a Vi6" gap all the way around and between the doors, see Fig. 19.

mount doors. There are a few steps to follow when mounting the doors. First, you need to cut three mortises in each door to hold the hinges. (They should match the thickness of the hinge leaf.) Then when the hinges are screwed to the doors, set the doors in the case on thin

DOOR RAIL

207/w"

2V2" 3V4"

Hinge mortise

DOOR PANEL

f Two layers plywood)

spacers to create the Vie" gap at the bottom of the doors. (I used pennies for spacers.)

Now, transfer the position of the hinges to the corner posts. This time, when cutting the mortises, set the depth so there's a Vi6" gap. Then mount the doors to the case.

Wood Drawer Guides

SECOND: Lay out arc on upper rails

Template, see

W J page 17

FIRST:

Trim doors Vs" shorter than opening

SECOND:

Cut mortises to create Vie" gap at sides

THIRD:

Trim equal amount from center stiles to create Vie" gap at center

FIRST:

Trim doors Vs" shorter than opening

SECOND:

Cut mortises to create Vie" gap at sides

THIRD:

Trim equal amount from center stiles to create Vie" gap at center

L

Vk" gap

front view

J

■gap-*

front view

SECOND: Lay out arc on upper rails

FIRST:

Dry assemble doors and set together

NOTE:

Make sure groove will be %" deep at narrow part of rail

Template, see

W J page 17

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