Info

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1 Sliding Blocks (2)

1" x 2'/2" x 8"

2 Handle (1)

1" x 27a" x 8"

3 Handle Fence (1)

1" x 2" x 8"

4 Steel Bushings (5)

3/8" o.d. x 3/4"

5 Threaded Inserts (4)

1/4-20 x 3/4"

6 Knurled-headed Bolts (4)

1/4-20 x 17/"

7 Guide Bars* (2)

3/8" Dia. x 15"

8 indexing Pin (1)

1/4" Dia. x 2"

9 Wooden Knob (1)

1" x 2" x 8"

*Length may vary as desired.

A/07F: The holes for the threaded inserts must reach the holes for the guide bars.

Plow a 1/8" groove to accept the handle's fence.

NOTE: The bushings are made from 3/8" steel tube (1/4" I.D.) cut to length. It is available at local hardware stores.

Sliding Block

(Top, Front and End Views)

Sliding Block

(Top, Front and End Views) T

Handle

(Top, Front and End Views)

Exploded View

Handle Fence Detail

A drill stop made from a piece of dowel is a great way to control drilling depth.

Indexing Pin

(Side View)

*Length may vary as desired.

Reader H. Wesley Phillips, an electrical engineer by trade, has been woodworking for 25 years in South Carolina.

To make best use of the author's jig, create a drill stop from a length of dowel so you can easily register the depth of your holes. Set up the jig to line up the shelf-pin holes, and your task is almost done.

By h. Wesley Phillips

While metal shelf standards are a very strong and versatile application, I think they can detract from the overall visual effect of certain pieces of furniture. I was building a custom bookshelf recently and decided that I could improve the overall appearance of the project by going with pins to support the shelves instead of shelf standards.

To achieve accurately and evenly spaced shelf-pin holes, I designed this jig. The jig allows you to drill four holes per setting in rows at the front and back of cabinet sides. Because it is adjustable, the locations for the rows of holes can easily be varied and set for casework of different depths and dimensions. The vertical relationship of the holes is fixed at 2". The 3/8" O.I), drill guide bushings work perfectly for aligning a 1/4" drill bit.

Layout and Construction

Because this jig will become a tool in your shop, pay particular attention to stock preparation and layout accuracy throughout this project Begin by selecting the stock for the wooden jig parts. I chose cherry because it's a tight-grained hardwood that holds bushings well, and is durable as well as attractive. After you've cut the hardwood parts to size and shape (pieces 1,2 and 3), lay out the holes for the guide bars in the sliding blocks and handle. Be sure to take a moment to plow the slight groove for the handle fence at this time. Refer to the Elevation Drawings at left for all the construction details. I marked the hole locations on the handle and then used the handle as a guide for marking the two sliding blocks. The holes will need to be drilled slightly larger than the guide bar's diameter.

Next, with the handle and sliding blocks on the guide bars, I laid out the holes for the five steel bushings (pieces 4). These holes need to be drilled slight ly undersize to get a good press fit. I inserted the bushings using a hammer and wooden block, leaving them flush with the top surface of the sliding blocks.

Threaded inserts (pieces 5) are installed at both ends of the handle and one end of each sliding block. They hold knurled-knob headed bolts (pieces 6) which secure the sliding blocks and handle to the guide bars

To make best use of the author's jig, create a drill stop from a length of dowel so you can easily register the depth of your holes. Set up the jig to line up the shelf-pin holes, and your task is almost done.

in their desired positions. I installed the threaded inserts so they were just flush with the surface.

My next step was to put a small radius on all the edges, using a stationary sander. Then I glued the two pieces of the handle and fence together and drilled a 1/4" hole for storing the indexing pin (piece 8) when you don't need it. I made a little knob (piece 9) from a section of dowel to top off the indexing pin. With everything else done, I sanded the assembly with 120- through 220-grit sandpaper and finished the wood with linseed oil and wax. I also used a woodburning tool with a chisel point to mark the centerlines of each sliding block.

'Hie beauty of this jig is its versatility. And if you wish to have a second set of longer guide bars.. .there will be even more opportunities to put it to good use.

Reader H. Wesley Phillips, an electrical engineer by trade, has been woodworking for 25 years in South Carolina.

Evenly spaced shelf holes are more attractive to the author than applied metal shelf standards. His simple and adjustable jig is sure to do long and valuable service in your shop.

Centerline is transferred to the inside edge prior to / the first pass with your dovetail bit, then transferred back to the groove after the cut.

The author's sliding dovetail jigs are a study in simplicity — appropriate in light of his years at the Stickley furniture plant. Here, the groove is being plowed in one pass.

Centerline is transferred to the inside edge prior to / the first pass with your dovetail bit, then transferred back to the groove after the cut.

The author's sliding dovetail jigs are a study in simplicity — appropriate in light of his years at the Stickley furniture plant. Here, the groove is being plowed in one pass.

Sliding Dovetail syst e m

By Jack Gray

Working in the Stickley sample shop was a challenge. Designers would come in with a blueprint of a piece of case goods (where cross rails had sliding dovetails) and say: "I need this built right away!" Early on, I devised a two-jig system for sliding dovetails that would handle the tails and grooves without calculations. Sometimes I made the groove jig long enough to be used for fixed shelves. Our rails and shelves were always 13/16" thick, so my preferred bit was a 3/4" dovetail on a 1/2" shank. I needed this heavy bit since the cuts were made in one pass.

Making the First Jig

To use these jigs, you'll need to replace your router's base plate with a 6" square piece of 1/4"

sheet plastic. The hole in the center should be 3/4" diameter to minimize the throat. For the groove jig itself, start with a 4" x 12" piece of 3/4" stock for the base (piece 1). Lap join one arm (piece 2) perpendicular to the base, as shown above. Place your router (with its new plate) on the base, position the second arm parallel to the first, and clamp it in position. Slide the router back and forth in an even, smooth action and adjust the arm as needed. Secure the second arm the same as the first.

Chuck a V-groove bit. in the router to project ever so slightly from its base. Score the base with this setup to create a centerline on the jig. Transfer the score-line onto the front edge of the jig with a square and knife. Now chuck your dovetail bit into the router and set the depth of cut to 3/8". Rout fully across the base of your jig and extend the centerline with a knife inside this cut.

Position your jig so its centerline is perfectly lined up with t he layout line of your desired dovetail. Clamp the jig, stock and bench together and you're ready to plow your first groove. You can use this jig when you're forming rails, fixed shelves, toeboards or shelf supports.

Making the Second Jig

Don't change that dial! The beauty of this sliding dovetail system is that by using the same router, setting and base plate to form both the groove and tail, you can virtually eliminate errors. As you can see from the Drawings, the tail jig is equally simple

Tail Jig

(Side View)

material list

Groove and Tall Jigs

1 Groove Jig Base (1) 3/4" x 47s" x 12"

Unlike any dovetail jig we've seen, the author's tail jig is clamped directly to the router base. With the router secure in a vise, the operation is smooth. Switching back to the groove jig takes a moment.

2 Groove Jig Arms (2) 5/8" x 2%" x 14'/2"

Unlike any dovetail jig we've seen, the author's tail jig is clamped directly to the router base. With the router secure in a vise, the operation is smooth. Switching back to the groove jig takes a moment.

material list

Groove and Tall Jigs

1 Groove Jig Base (1) 3/4" x 47s" x 12"

2 Groove Jig Arms (2) 5/8" x 2%" x 14'/2"

4 Tail Jig Feed Tables (2) 5/8" x 2V x 3'/2"

Tail Jig

(Side View)

to make: just a tall fence (piece 3) with small infeed and outfeed tables (pieces 4) all screwed to a base (piece 5). Cut a small notch into the center of the fence to fit the bit, then assemble the pieces with glue and screws. It's all clamped to the router's new 6" square plastic base plate. Rail stock will be run vertically across the face of this jig, another advantage of the new base plate — you get a nice smooth surface with a small throat

Using the Tail Jig

Clamp your router in the inverted position. I used to just, clamp mine in the tail vise of my bench, but now I use another jig to hold it more efficiently. Clamp the jig to the router base with the bit projecting just past the edge of the fence.

The only trial-and-error adjustment in this system is arriving at the right width. Use scrap stock to establish the proper size by adjusting the position of the jig and testing the fit in the groove. Once you get it right, all of your cuts will be correct because you have not changed the depth of the cut.

While this system will guarantee you perfect sliding dovetails when used correctly, it also demands control and organization on your part. All of your pieces must be cut to length and sized before you start And remember, once you set. your router depth, it cannot be changed until all of the cutting is completed.

Case Good Tips From an Old Pro

When assembling case goods, it's helpful to use clamps to hold the sides and pull them together, in case there is any bow in them. Also, it doesn't hurt to clamp the sides at each rail until the glue dries. And speaking of glue — polyurethane glue in a sliding dovetail is like grease. It. doesn't swell the wood like carpenter's glue, and it's not tacky either. Sliding a fixed shelf into position with any other glue is an absolute nightmare. Just trust me on that

Reader Jack Gray is retired from L & J. G. Stickley, Inc., founded by Gustav Stickley's brothers.

In Our Readers' Woodshops

Tool collecting has become more than a hobby for John Sindelar of Edwardsburg, Michigan.

His tools are about to outgrow their storage space at his woodworking business and get their own museum. The tool shown at right is a double-edged plane (one blade for cutting hardwoods, the other for softwoods). John says, "I'm a plane guy."

A Woodworker's Journal workbench pattern was inspiration for this reader's shop.

I really liked the design of your workbench plan, especially the tool cabinet and lower tool shelf you included. As you can see, I went with a twin screw vise as well as an additional shoulder vise.

In using the bench, I've enjoyed the stability of it as I push and pull it around using hand saws, planes, augers, scrapers, etc.

Tim McCloskey Boerne, Texas

Proud that an article on shop maintenance in the Journal inspired a cleanup day, this reader sent in photographic proof.

Taking time to move, vacuum, sort and "file" practically everything in my shop is something I don't do often (or care to do again any time soon). As you can see, the effort was not without benefit, and I do feel pretty proud of myself.

Carl Tobin Stanley, New York

Joe Clay Young didn't just inherit some tools from his Jonesboro, Arkansas ancestors — he got the whole shop.

His great-grandfather and great-uncle owned a warehouse, lumberyard, sawmill and furniture production facility from about 1901 to the 1950s, with tools like a 5HP DeWalt saw (above) and a foot-pedal ripsaw (above, right). Clay said, "It's almost like a time capsule," and his wife, Pamela, added, "Nothing's put away. There's dust and tools lying out It looks like they just got up and left."

This loyal reader had a special clamp request...

My interest in woodworking started with your magazine's first issue. I attempt to make something from each issue as an ongoing learning program and for the enjoyment.

Every project requires clamps. I did not start out with a master design for my clamp holder/storage stand. It just ended up this way. My only request: stop putting projects in your issue that require a new type of clamp.

David DiKanna Fountain Valley, California

Keeping tools sharp is important in the shop, and a WJ sharpening station project came at the right time for Jack Frost of Maple Valley, Washington.

He used leftover melamine from a closet project and mill-run black walnut to construct the sharpening center — and added #20 biscuits to produce a more secure joint between the floor and the bottom trim.

Bob's shop has overhead storage for portable power tools; a wall cabinet for drill bits and cutters; and more storage for tenoning and abrasives supplies — and snacks.

Bob Rich wrote to Woodworker's Journal that he was "85 years young" and had been woodworking since he was 10.

The Sherburn, Massachusetts, resident also sent a detailed sketch of his shop, with some history of his tools and his tool-buying life. "When I was 14, I bought my first machine. It was from Kresge's and it cost $1.50.1 took it back. A year later, my father gave me a 'synchrosaw,' which had a vibrating motor. That cost $7.50 and was a satisfactory tool." He now has a shop that's about 1,053 square feet, with over 100 tools.

Shop tools may be important to Amelia Redig of River Falls, Wisconsin, but she doesn't fight the wood:

"I try to let the wood develop while I'm turning it," she told the Journal. "I have a form in mind, but the wood determines where I go." And, she notes, "In turning, you're not just working with a cutting tool; you ARK the cutter."

Steve Knight both makes and uses planes (his shop doesn't have a planer).

Passing along favorite tools to the next generation is one of the top joys our readers share with us. Generations of woodworkers have had fun with this family's "shop toy"

"Here's a photo of one of the neatest shop toys for kids. Mine used the scroll saw as they grew up, and now my grandson is having fun with it."

George Trusk Mercer Island, Washington

Combining two workbench plans, both from Woodworker's Journal, created one bench for this reader.

'The oak benchtop is made from the flooring of an old railway car. It's so old that the bolt holes that mounted it to the steel frame were made with a hot poker. "

Larry Hush Roseburg, Oregon

He started making planes in Portland, Oregon, because he wanted "some nice tools for myself, but since I couldn't afford to buy 'em, I thought I'd try making a few." It grew into a business, with his four sharpening wheels as his most specialized equipment.

Todays Woodworker

Woodworker's Journal readers love to share their projects, some from the magazine, some from their own ideas, and we love to show off their work! here's a small sampling.

Fred Cogelow of Willmar, Minnesota, is a full-time carver. "Of course my dog, Ola, has all the ideas," he says — although "Joyride" was a commissioned piece.

Milton Kretsch of Newbury Park, California, saved Woodworker's Journal plans for a slatted cradle for years, and built this one for his first grandchild.

"It took me 400 hours and 100 woods to carve this toolbox and the 98 handcarved tools and hardware pieces. The harder the wood was, the easier the thing I tried to make out of it."

Mark Gordon Columbus, Ohio

"Perhaps I am the apothecary chest champ. The picture is of my 16th chest, plus your July/August, 1987 issue, which featured the chest on its cover. Number 17 is already on the drawing board."

Hank Blake Greensburg, Pennsylvania

Fred Cogelow of Willmar, Minnesota, is a full-time carver. "Of course my dog, Ola, has all the ideas," he says — although "Joyride" was a commissioned piece.

Milton Kretsch of Newbury Park, California, saved Woodworker's Journal plans for a slatted cradle for years, and built this one for his first grandchild.

West Point, New York, said he learned some great new techniques when he built our Barrister's Bookcase. He completed the project for his father-in-law, who was retiring from a driving career.

West Point, New York, said he learned some great new techniques when he built our Barrister's Bookcase. He completed the project for his father-in-law, who was retiring from a driving career.

"I made your Teddy Bear Rocking Chair for my niece's new baby. When her brother-in-law saw it, he wanted one for his grandson. Both of them turned out great."

Ed Schiermann Dallas, Texas

Roy Fross of San Francisco, California, made Card Playing Coasters and then, "I had all of the cut-outs from the inlay and wondered what to do with them." The result: a very cool nightlight.

"Per the Adirondack Chair plans you published, here's a photo of one of the two chairs I built plus a table out of the leftover mahogany. It was a fun project." Bmce D. Woods Seneca, South Carolina

"I used Honduran mahogany and finished the Bench Glider from your magazine with ZAR tung oil. This was probably a little ambitious for my first furniture piece; however, this effort proved to be a big boost to my confidence."

Michael Colicchio Summerland Key, Florida

"I recently wrote to ask your advice on the proper paint finish for a wooden pedal car I was building. I think it came out rather well, and my granddaughter pedals it all over her patio."

I)r. Jim Naeve Coon Rapids, Minnesota

"I made several Child's Adirondack Chair and Settees in both cypress and cedar. As you can see, Maya and her special friend enjoy their settee as they wait for lunch: peanut butter and jelly plus a bowl of milk."

Charles Albertson

Ripley, Tennessee

"I thought you may find my rendition of the the Woven Rocking Chair featured in the Journal interesting. It is constructed using mortise and tenon joinery, and the rockers and armrests are made from poplar. It took about eight hockey sticks to make the rest of the chair."

John Ixach Columbus, Ohio

"I fell in love with the Chess Set plan but was intimidated by the project. The idea of veneer and band sawing on that level would have to wait. Through the years, I have worked to imrpove my skills, and your magazine has been at the forefront of these efforts. Now retired, I was looking for a special gift for my son. The results you will find in the picture."

J.M. White Victoria, British Columbia

Sydney Webster of Willowdale, Ontario, built his grandson Tyler a treasure chest. Countersinking the screws and covering them with wooden buttons simulated rivet heads, he said, adding, "The frogs aren't permanent."

"The Heirloom Bookcase from your magazine was probably the most challenging project I've built in my eight years of woodworking, but the results turned out great. It was the first time I'd worked with mahogany. I added bullnose molding around the drawers."

David Wagner Edgerton, Wisconsin

"The Prairie Lantern featured in Woodworker's Journal held my interest for several years, so I finally built one this past Christmas. Then I built one for each of my four children as their birthday gifts. While the project was quite involved and required several jigs, I enjoyed every minute."

Dick Ren/row Raleigh, North Carolina

"I had almost as much fun building this Riding Biplane as my son has riding on it."

Steve Moloney Covington, Ohio

"I had almost as much fun building this Riding Biplane as my son has riding on it."

Steve Moloney Covington, Ohio

"I built your Poker Box plan out of walnut rather than mahogany. My dovetail inserts were made from hard maple. I would never have thought of creating them in the manner demonstrated."

Charles T. Miller Cranford, New Jersey

Carol Johnston of Peru, Indiana, said the appeal of making her dining room suite was "that I can design a piece to be exactly what I want."

"To complete my set of Frank Lloyd Wright chairs from your magazine, I used every tool in my garage except a router. I learned how to use a spokeshave, cut non-45° miters by hand, and sand more than I thought should be legal in some states!"

Stephen Lookadoo, Jr.

Simpsonville, South Carolina

John McAlister of Charlotte, North Carolina, modeled this Newport secretary after a museum example. "They would not let me touch the piece. They sent an intern in to pull out drawers and open doors."

"The nine Croquet Sets were the largest lathe project I have ever undertaken. I put the wicket holder on the other end of the unit by accident on the first assembly. I liked it, so I did it on all of them. For the nine sets, there were 279 total turnings."

David G. Clark Gurnee, Illinois

Bob Klueg of Plainfield, Indiana, built a Cradle for his first grandchild, and taught woodworking while visiting the child's family in Kenya. "Most of us in the States are addicted to power tools. The old way sometimes works just as well."

Dan Gindling of San Diego, California, used recycled urban sycamore and walnut in his CD cabinet. "You're not cutting down a rainforest. I told [my wife] that this is the only CD cabinet I'm ever making her, so that's why it holds 700."

Dan Gindling of San Diego, California, used recycled urban sycamore and walnut in his CD cabinet. "You're not cutting down a rainforest. I told [my wife] that this is the only CD cabinet I'm ever making her, so that's why it holds 700."

Jim Smith of Edmonds, Washington, built his teardrop trailer out of mahogany and oak. "It just totally consumed me. I keep thinking of new things that it needs."

Charlie Cheney of Lancaster, South Carolina, adapted Woodworker's Journal plans to make a Jewelry Box which locks. He added a full mortised lock and lid support and back-mounted stop hinges. Then he gave the box to his granddaughter, who said, "This is sooo cool!"

Jerry Hallan of Jacksonville, Florida, makes wood chips and shavings specifically for his sculptures. "It's satisfying. In the academic world, you deal with students, and then they're gone," he said. "In woodworking," which Jerry looks on as a second career, "I like having a product when I'm done."

"In September, my daughter and her husband announced they were expecting our first grandchild. It so happened that Woodworker's Journal had step-by-step instructions on how to build a high chair. In November, we were told, 'Surprise, we're expecting twins!' The high chairs were completed just in time for their very first use."

Greg Rupp St. Cloud, Minnesota

The first inset doors Bill Gelataka of Prince Frederick, Maryland, ever made were on his version of our Entertainment Center III.

James Kachel of Woodbury, Minnesota, built the jewelry cabinet above. "I'm a lover of quartersawn leopard wood. I try to get some radius into my pieces."

Wisdom from the Shop

Woodworkers who were lucky enough to take shop class in school often look back fondly on the experience and the wisdom they learned there — and they're willing to share their

Chris D'Esposito's desk is made from African ribbon mahogany.

Paul Steiner's shop class in Woodbridge, Virginia, made over 1,000 wooden toy trucks for Toys for Tots.

High school senior Matt Blackburn built a cherry clock after starting with simpler projects.

Chris D'Esposito's desk is made from African ribbon mahogany.

Student Creations

Before taking George Trout's woodworking classes at Springfield [Pennsylvania] High, "I used to build ramps and stuff for my skateboard, but nothing like this," said high school junior Brett Shaffer.

George says, "We do simple joinery that a 14- or 15-year-old can handle. I like to teach it as a problem-solving technique. If you have 100 pieces in your project, you have 100 problems. It's a way to train creative thinking."

Students' works are displayed to the community at an annual show. "There are a lot of parents with tears in their eyes," George said. "Even if there are production mistakes that the kid and I know about the parents don't see them"

Junior student Amanda Gessay said she sees her future woodworking "not as a job, but as a side hobby in my garage. I don't think I ever want to give it up. I think I'll like it forever.'

High school senior Matt Blackburn built a cherry clock after starting with simpler projects.

own "shop le

Paul Steiner's shop class in Woodbridge, Virginia, made over 1,000 wooden toy trucks for Toys for Tots.

Thanks, Teach

Thanks for your article on "Trucks for Tots." Your article brought back great memories of my high school years and one of my greatest learning experiences: building Toys for Tots with instructor Vernon Pack at Ogden High School in Ogden, Utah. I still use the lessons learned from Mr. Pack regularly. Mr. Steiner may not know today what his impact will be on his students, but for me it was a turning point in my life. Keep up the good work, Mr. Steiner, you are changing lives.

Scott Dixon Roy, Utah

Students like Brian Bretherick are still learning to use routers and other tools from shop teachers who dispense shop wisdom.

High school senior Bill Belland's spice chest includes hand-cut dovetails, front and back.

This tool, featured in Woodworker's Journal, was invented by our reader's teacher.

Students like Brian Bretherick are still learning to use routers and other tools from shop teachers who dispense shop wisdom.

High school senior Bill Belland's spice chest includes hand-cut dovetails, front and back.

High School Memories

I read in August. 2002 Woodworker's Journal about the circular saw sharpener and patent by Carleton Philips and William Sanford. Bill Sanford was my Painted Post (New York) High School science instructor, teaching biology, chemistry and physics. I remember he gave my dad one of his early sharpeners, which Dad used for years. Bill was quite an inventor. He was a great teacher.

Jack Voggenthaler Blairsden, California

This tool, featured in Woodworker's Journal, was invented by our reader's teacher.

Senior Bob Bollinger built a birch chest of drawers that took to heart his shop teacher's suggestion of "the stranger, the better."

Brad Stanton's cabinet of African ribbon mahogany, lacewood and ebony capped his career as a high school woodworker.

High school students like Dan Lanciano learn the wisdom of puzzling out problems in wood

Amanda Broemel made this Honduran mahogany bed as a high school junior.

Upper-level students like senior Vince Yanni buy their wood "pretty much off the tree," for projects like this birch entertainment unit.

Amanda Broemel made this Honduran mahogany bed as a high school junior.

Upper-level students like senior Vince Yanni buy their wood "pretty much off the tree," for projects like this birch entertainment unit.

High school students like Dan Lanciano learn the wisdom of puzzling out problems in wood

Shop Class: It's Not Just for Kids

Michael McCray, a mechanical engineer from New Mexico, honed his woodworking skills at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center — one of the many schools for grownup woodworkers.

When Woodworker's Journal subscriber Michael McCray won a week's schooling at the renowned Anderson Ranch Arts Center near Aspen, Colorado, he chose Professional Wood Finishing. Michael took up woodworking about five years ago to replace golf. His first project was a Sante Fe chair, which was built with hand tools and a palm

Students like Katie Fogarty take great pride in their woodworking projects.

sander. He likes to dream of becoming a professional after he retires from a job in computers, "graduating from microchips to wood chips." As for his finishing class, he says he has a brand-new outlook on the whole process: "When I built my first, few projects, finishing was no more than an afterthought. It was like ending a really good meal with a bowl of Jell-O®. Now I know that there are some very nice gourmet desserts available."

Life Lessons from the Shops of our readers

Woodworker's Journal readers responded to editor in chief Rob Johnstone's call for "life lessons learned from the shop" with these bits of wisdom:

Whenever anything is dropped, it will always end up in the most inconvenient spot for retrieval.

Dan Schlegel Toledo, Ohio

Our Low Country Turners group (Savannah, Georgia) has a saying that, when experiencing a serious "catch" while turning wood that tears a chunk out of a piece being worked on, the event merely provides the turner with a "design opportunity." While said primarily in jest, we have found that (after cussing a bit) if you step back and take a serious look at some practical way to salvage the work in progress, you can indeed end up with an even more creative and improved design than the one you initially had in mind.

Douglas H. West Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

If you can't fix it with a hammer, you must have an electrical problem.

Just because you're not bleeding, doesn't mean you're safe.

Think of your wife as you would a piece of good lumber sometimes the age, knots and defects make it that much more beautiful.

If you stop and wonder if something you're doing is safe, it's probably not

If you're holding a board while applying finish on one side and drop it, the probability of it hitting the floor finish side up is inversely proportional to the amount of dust on the floor.

Greg L.Summers, Director Norman, Oklahoma

Woodworking Math Geeks

"Measure twice, cut once"... even in its traditional sayings, you see how important math is to woodworking.

Woodworker's Journal readers can be counted on to show off their math skills.

Screw Sizes: The Easy Way

There's a very easy way to figure the outside diameter of all screw sizes. The magic number is 13. If you multiply the screw size by .013 and add .060, you get the outside diameter.

Example: the #4 screw is .112 diameter. By multiplying 4 x .013 = .052 + .060 = .112 diameter.

You can find out any size of screw by using this method.

Ron Pavelka, Orange, California

An Eye on the Golden Ratio

Aw, come on, Ian! Although I can't measure accurately from the pictures, doesn't your design

A reader thought Woodworker's Journal author Ian Kirby's "Wall-Hung Bookcase" involved more math than revealed.

A reader thought Woodworker's Journal author Ian Kirby's "Wall-Hung Bookcase" involved more math than revealed.

of "A Wall-Hung Bookcase" approximate the Golden Ratio — rather than simply being a "shape" to accommodate cookbooks between two windows? If we approximate the top two areas as 4.5 units and the bottom area as 2.75 units - for a total of 7.25 units — the Golden Ratio would suggest 7.25, yielding 4.5 units and 4.5 units yielding 2.8 units. Aren't we really dealing here with the eye of a master woodworker not allowing himself to build to "bad" proportions, regardless of the space between the windows or the size of cookbooks?

Rich Donahue Huachuca City, Arizona

Striking a Plywood Nerve

A plywood manufacturer producing millions of sheets a year has strict controls and produces sheets which are deliberately 23/32" thick, not 3/4". I still want to know why!

Nigel Bond Getzville, New York

To make a 2" wide cove that is 3/8" deep, use a fence angle of 31.75°.

Understanding Plywood Labels

Product Standard:

productions^ specifics

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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